Alala

October 7th, 2010 by sabrina

Alala (pronounced AL-ah-luh) is the Greek Goddess of the war-cry. She is the daughter of Polemos, the God who is the personification of war, and Hybris, Goddess of aggression. Alala accompanied Ares, God of war and battle, and her name was his battle-cry. Alala’s name means “war-cry.”

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Akte

October 6th, 2010 by sabrina

Akte (pronounced ack-TAY) is one of the Greek Horai, Goddesses of the hours of daylight. Not to be confused with the Horai of the seasons, these twelve Horai were the daughters of Helios, God of the sun, and each one was responsible for one-twelfth of the length of daylight time (not necessarily one hour as we understand it). Akte’s time was in the afternoon, and was known as the second of the work-hours. It was also associated with an afternoon meal. Akte’s name, which may mean “corn,” is also seen as Acte.

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Aktaie

October 5th, 2010 by sabrina

Aktaie (pronounced ack-TIE-eh) is one of the Greek Nereides. The Nereides were the 50 daughters of Nereus, God of the sea, and Doris, one of the Okeanides. Nereides were responsible for the sea, fish, and sailors. Each had dominion over some attribute of the sea, such as the way that foam formed upon the waves or the swiftness of a current. Aktaie was responsible for the seashore. Her name, which means “headland,” is also seen as Aktaia or Actaea.

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Akraia

October 4th, 2010 by sabrina

Akraia (pronounced ah-CRY-uh) is one of the Greek Naiades. The Naiades were generally thought to be daughters of an Okeanid mother (the 3000 daughters of Tethys and Okeanos, Goddesses of fresh water sources) and a Potamoi father (the 3000 sons of Tethys and Okeanos, Gods of the rivers); in Akraia’s case, her father was Asterion, God of the River Asterion near Mycenae. Along with her sisters Euboia and Prosymna, Akraia nursed the Goddess Hera when she was an infant, and her name was later used as one of Hera’s epithets. Akraia’s name, which means “of the heights,” is also seen as Acraea.

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Akhlys

October 3rd, 2010 by sabrina

Akhlys (pronounced ack-LOOS) is the Greek Goddess of the mist of death. She is also the personification of misery, and she was often found on battlefields, spreading her mist over the eyes of the dying. Akhlys was portrayed on the shield of Heracles as a pale, thin wraith of a woman, covered in dust, blood, and her own tears. Her name, which means “death-mist,” is also seen as Achlys.

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Agaue

October 2nd, 2010 by sabrina

Agaue (pronounced ah-GOW-ay) is one of the Greek Nereides. The Nereides were the 50 daughters of Nereus, God of the sea, and Doris, one of the Okeanides. Nereides were responsible for the sea, fish, and sailors. Each had dominion over some attribute of the sea, such as the way that foam formed upon the waves or the swiftness of a current. Agaue’s name, which means “illustrious,” is also seen as Agave.

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Eudora

September 23rd, 2010 by sabrina

Eudora (pronounced you-DOR-uh) is the Greek Goddess of heavy rain. She is one of the Okeanides, the 3000 daughters of Tethys and Okeanos, Goddess and God of the oceans. The Okeanides were responsible for fresh water sources, whether from the earth (such as springs and rivers) or from the sky (such as clouds and rain). Eudora’s name means “good gifts.”

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Akeso

September 13th, 2010 by sabrina

Akeso (pronounced ah-KEE-so) is the Greek Goddess of the healing process. She is one of the daughter of Asklepios, God of medicine, and Epione, Goddess of pain relief, and is sister to Aigle, Hygieia, Panakeia, and Iaso. Akeso’s name, which means “curing,” is also seen as Aceso.

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The Heliades

September 12th, 2010 by sabrina

Ancient sources vary in the number and names of the Heliades—I’ve gone with the list given by Hyginus in Fabulae.

The Heliades (pronounced hel-EE-a-deez) are Greek Nymphs, the seven daughters of Helios, God of the sun, and the Okeanid Klymene. Helios and Klymene also had a son, Phaethon, who begged his father to let him drive his sun chariot. When Helios reluctantly agreed, Phaethon lost control of the horses and drove too close to the earth, scorching it. Zeus struck him down with a thunderbolt to stop the destruction, and Phaethon fell to his death in the River Eridanos. His sisters, the Heliades, gathered there to mourn him, where Zeus turned them into poplar trees. The trees cry still, in golden drops of sap that turn to amber when they fall. The names of the seven Heliades are Aetherie (also seen as Aethria; means “clear sky”), Aigle (also seen as Aegle; means “radiant”), Dioxippe (means “horse-driving”), Helie (also seen as Helia; means “of the sun”), Lampetie (also seen as Lampetia; means “shining”), Merope (means “face-turned”), and Phoibe (also seen as Phoebe; means “bright”).

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Aitna

September 11th, 2010 by sabrina

Aitna (pronounced AYT-nuh) is the Greek Goddess of Mount Etna in Sicily. She is the daughter of Gaia, Goddess of the earth, and Ouranos, God of the sky. Aitna arbitrated between Demeter, Goddess of the earth’s bounty, and Hephaistos, God of fire and smithcraft, in their dispute over who would rule over Sicily—Demeter wanted the island for its fertile lands, and Hephaistos wanted it for its volcanic activity. She eventually decided to give the island to the Greek people and they colonized Sicily, erecting many temples to both Demeter and Hephaistos. Aitna also became the mother of the nymph Thaleia by Hephaistos; Thaleia would later have an affair with Zeus and give birth to the Palikoi, twin Gods of geysers and oaths. Aitna’s name is also seen as Aetna.

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