Loviatar

October 19th, 2009 by sabrina

star-of-heavenLoviatar (pronounced lo-VEE-at-ar) is the Finnish Goddess of plagues. She is the blind daughter of Tuonetar and Tuoni, Goddess and God of the Underworld. The Kalevala calls Loviatar “black in heart and soul and visage,” and tells of her impregnation by the east wind. When she went into labor, Loviatar went to Louhi, Goddess of sorcery, who helped her to give birth to nine sons. The first eight of these sons she named Pistos (consumption), Ähky (colic), Luuvalo (gout), Riisi (rickets), Paise (ulcer), Rupi (scab), Syöjä (cancer), and Rutto (plague). The ninth, who personified envy, was not named. Loviatar’s name is also seen as Louhiatar, Louhetar, Loveatar, Lovetar, and Lovehetar.

This entry was posted on Monday, October 19th, 2009 at 4:32 pm and is filed under Norse. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

4 responses about “Loviatar”

  1. Bashi said:

    She is quite beautiful despite the birth of 9 sons who are all quite leacherous. Why wasn’t
    envy” named?

  2. sabrina said:

    That’s not actually her. That’s a painting called “Night” by Edward Robert Hughes and I use it when I can’t find a picture of my featured Goddess. Envy wasn’t named because he was the most fearsome of Loviatar’s sons. It’s one of those “so frightening that you can’t say his name” kind of things.

  3. Aconitum said:

    As a finnish witch I have to say this: I like the text, but actually the ninth son was named; as Envy and curses for all the land. Ninth son of Loviatar was a pest for all; the evergrowing one in harm, and also a beginning of all the wicked witches and sorceress that did people harm. In a way Loviatar is a witch-goddess of Finland, too.
    And the most feared of all Loviatar’s sons was actually Wolf; A beast-like son who only ate the flesh of the living and chewed on bones of the dead.

  4. rafetherathaster said:

    I have great affection for Loviatar, but only because of the ahistorical portrayal in AD&D.