Chalchiuhtlicue

June 19th, 2008 by sabrina

Today’s Goddess puts my total number of names up to 2500, one-quarter of the way to my goal! Also, you may have noticed that my shopping cart is gone—it blew up last week and I’m hoping it will be back up and running (new and improved!) by the middle of next week.

Chalchiuhtlicue (pronounced chal-chee-OOT-lee-kway) is the Aztec Goddess of all running water, including rain. She also ruled over fertility, as water was known to bring life to plants. She is the wife of the rain God Tlaloc, and rules over Tlalocan at his side. Tlalocan is the fourth layer of the heavens, the place to which those who died from phenomena associated with water, such as drowning, went in the afterlife. One day, Chalchiuhtlicue, looking at the evils in the world, began to cry—her tears streamed across the land as a giant flood to cleanse the world. She created a rainbow bridge to save those who gained her favor.

Chalchiuhtlicue is usually depicted wearing a jade necklace, a crown of feathers, and with a skirt decorated with water lilies. Her name means “she who wears a jade skirt,” and she was also known as Matlalcueitl by the Tlaxcala, which means “she who wears a green skirt”.

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