Archive for November, 2010

Amatheia

November 29th, 2010 by sabrina

Amatheia (pronounced a-ma-THEE-uh) is one of the Greek Nereides. The Nereides were the 50 daughters of Nereus, God of the sea, and Doris, one of the Okeanides. Nereides were responsible for the sea, fish, and sailors. Each had dominion over some attribute of the sea, such as the way that foam formed upon the waves or the swiftness of a current. Amatheia was responsible for nursing young fish. Her name, which means “nourisher,” is also seen as Amathea.

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Amaltheia

November 28th, 2010 by sabrina

Amaltheia (pronounced a-mal-THEE-uh) is a Greek Nymph, who, according to some sources, fed the infant Zeus with the milk of a goat. Other sources say that she actually was the goat. As a nymph, she was the wife of King Melisseus of Crete, and mother of the nymphs Adrasteia and Ida, who helped her to nurse Zeus. Aside from feeding Zeus, Amaltheia also suspended him in a cradle from the branch of a tree, so that he could not be found in heaven, on earth, or in the sea. When her goat broke off one of its horns, she filled it with herbs and fruit and gave it to the baby—the first horn of plenty or cornucopia. Zeus later placed the goat and its horn among the stars, as the constellations Capra and Capricornus. Amaltheia’s name, which means either “tender goddess” or “she who nourishes,” is also seen as Amalthea or Amalthia.

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Alkinoe

November 27th, 2010 by sabrina

Alkinoe (pronounced AL-kih-no-ee) is one of the Greek Naiades. The Naiades were generally thought to be daughters of an Okeanid mother (the 3000 daughters of Tethys and Okeanos, Goddesses of fresh water sources) and a Potamoi father (the 3000 sons of Tethys and Okeanos, Gods of the rivers). Naiades were particularly responsible for water that came up from the earth, such as springs, fountains, and wells. Alkinoe’s spring was on Mount Lykaios in Arkadia; she and eight other nymphs helped Rhea in her labor with Zeus and nursed him as an infant. Alkinoe’s name, which means “strong mind,” is also seen as Alcinoe.

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The Alkyonides

November 26th, 2010 by sabrina

The Alkyonides are Greek nymphs of fair weather. They were the daughters of Alkyoneus, King of the Giants, who was killed by Herakles after he had killed a number of the latter’s men. In their grief, they threw themselves into the sea, where they were transformed by Amphitrite, Goddess of the sea, into kingfishers. The Alkyonides became associated with a period of time at the end of December and beginning of January that traditionally has had good weather in Greece, with calm seas and fair sailing. While some ancient authors said that there were as many as eleven Alkyonides, seven have been clearly identified. Their names are Alkippa (also seen as Alcippa; means “strong horse”), Anthe (means “bloom”), Asterie (also seen as Asteria; means “starry”), Drimo (means “piercing”), Methone (means “of Methone,” a town in Thrace), Pallene (means “brandishing”), and Phosthonia (means “light”). The name Alkyonides itself, which is also seen as Alcyonides, means “of Alkyoneus,” and the seven sisters were also known as the Alkyonis or Alcyonis, which means “kingfishers.”

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Alke

November 25th, 2010 by sabrina

Alke (pronounced AL-kee) is one of the Greek Naiades. The Naiades were generally thought to be daughters of an Okeanid mother (the 3000 daughters of Tethys and Okeanos, Goddesses of fresh water sources) and a Potamoi father (the 3000 sons of Tethys and Okeanos, Gods of the rivers); in Alke’s case, her father was Saggarios, God of the River Saggarios in Phrygia. Naiades were particularly responsible for water that came up from the earth, such as springs, fountains, and wells. Alke’s name, which means “strength,” is also seen as Alce.

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